Chicago Band Comes to Tampa.

THE INSPIRATIONS: Chicago

Even at a stately and occasionally staid venue like Ruth Eckerd Hall, you can bet a band like Chicago will get fans on their feet for a good chunk of the show. Maybe not always on ballads like If You Leave Me Now or You’re the Inspiration, but definitely horn-rippin’ favorites like Street Player, 25 or 6 to 4 and Saturday in the Park. Key veterans Robert Lamm, Lee Loughnane and James Pankow are still holding it down live, even if longtime vocalists Peter Cetera and Jason Scheff are no longer in the mix. 8 p.m. Friday. 1111 McMullen-Booth Road, Clearwater. $64.25 and up. (727) 791-7400. ruth eckerd hall.com.

Chicago Band

Chicago is an American rock band formed in 1967 in Chicago, Illinois, calling themselves the Chicago Transit Authority in 1968 before shortening the name in 1969. The self-described “rock and roll band with horns” began writing politically charged rock music, and later moved to a softer sound, generating several hit ballads. The group had a steady stream of hits throughout the 1970s and 1980s. In September 2008, Billboard ranked Chicago at number thirteen in a list of the top 100 artists of all time for Hot 100 singles chart success, and ranked them at number fifteen on the same list produced in October 2015. Billboard also ranked Chicago ninth on the list of the hundred greatest artists of all time in terms of Billboard 200 album chart success in October 2015. Chicago is one of the longest-running and most successful rock groups, and one of the world’s best-selling groups of all time, having sold more than 100 million records. In 1971, Chicago was the first rock act to sell out Carnegie Hall for a week.

To date, Chicago has sold over 40 million units in the U.S., with 23 gold, 18 platinum, and 8 multi-platinum albums. They have had five consecutive number-one albums on the Billboard 200 and 20 top-ten singles on the Billboard Hot 100. In 1974 the group had seven albums, its entire catalog at the time, on the Billboard 200 simultaneously. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2016. In 2017, original band members Peter Cetera, Robert Lamm, and James Pankow were elected to the Songwriters Hall of Fame for their songwriting efforts as members of the music group.
While gaining some success as a cover band, the group began working on original songs. In June 1968, at manager James William Guercio’s request, the Big Thing moved to Los Angeles, California, signed with Columbia Records and changed its name to Chicago Transit Authority. It was while performing on a regular basis at the Whisky a Go Go nightclub in West Hollywood that the band got exposure to more famous musical artists of the time. Subsequently, they were the opening act for Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix.77–78,106–107 As related to group biographer, William James Ruhlmann, by Walt Parazaider, Jimi Hendrix once told Parazaider, “‘Jeez, your horn players are like one set of lungs and your guitar player is better than me.

Their first record (April 1969), Chicago Transit Authority, is a double album, which is rare for a band’s first release. The album made it to No. 17 on the Billboard 200 album chart, sold over one million copies by 1970, and was awarded a platinum disc. The album included a number of pop-rock songs – “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”, “Beginnings”, “Questions 67 and 68”, and “I’m a Man” – which were later released as singles. For this inaugural recording effort the group was nominated for a Grammy Award for 1969 Best New Artist of the Year.

According to Cetera, the band was booked to perform at Woodstock in 1969, but promoter Bill Graham, with whom they had a contract, exercised his right to reschedule them to play at the Fillmore West on a date of his choosing, and he scheduled them for the Woodstock dates. Santana, which Graham also managed, took Chicago’s place at Woodstock, and that performance is considered to be Santana’s “breakthrough” gig. A year later, in 1970, when he needed to replace headliner Joe Cocker, and then Cocker’s intended replacement, Jimi Hendrix, Graham booked Chicago to perform at Tanglewood which is considered by some to be a “pinnacle” performance.

After the release of their first album, the band’s name was shortened to Chicago to avoid legal action being threatened by the actual mass-transit company of the same name.
Comments;

As a privately owned web site, we reserve the right to edit or remove comments that contain spam, advertising, vulgarity, threats of violence, racism, anti-Semitism, or personal/abusive attacks on other users. The same applies to trolling, the use of multiple aliases, or just generally being a jerk. Enforcement of this policy is at the sole discretion of the site administrators and repeat offenders may be blocked or permanently banned without warning. Guest posting is disabled for security reasons.
Like IKA News & Reports?

Like Us on:
Facebook / Twitter

© 2019 IKA News, All Rights Reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.


Help Support IKA by Placing Your Ad Here!!
Call 813-401-5236 Mon-Fri 9am to 4pm (EST)


Did you know?

God is everywhere—even in the news. That’s why we view every news story through the lens of faith. We are committed to delivering quality independent Christian journalism you can trust. But it takes a lot of hard work, time, and money to do what we do. Help us continue to be a voice for truth in the media by supporting IKA News for as little as $2 a day. Call 813-401-5236 9am-4pm mon-fri to Donate today! We Thank You & God Bless.


Thank You for Sharing!
Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply